Grooming Tips for Pet Parents

Different Types of Brushes for your Dog

Hey there pet parents!

Brushing your dog is a key part of taking care of them. Not only does it feel really good to them, it helps you bond and strengthen your relationship. Brushing your dog also gives you a great opportunity to see how your dog is doing physically. Over time you will be able to notice subtle changes: new bumps or moles, if your dog is sensitive to touch in areas, if the skin is getting dry or flaky, etc. Bring these things up to your groomer, trainer or vet. It can make a huge difference!

Depending on the kind of dog and the coat type they, it will determine what type of brushes you should use and how often you should brush them.

So how often? Let’s cover that first! From my experience, I recommend a daily or every other day brushing for long hair dogs which I consider to be dogs like Poodle/Doodle, Shih Tzu, Yorkie, Maltese and such. Breeds with hair that grow continuously like ours. 

 And a weekly brushing for our short hair or double coated dogs. These are our shedders: goldens, labs, beagles, Shelties etc. 

Brushing prevents matting, helps make coats shiny and soft, and lessens shedding. 

CAUTION: With some brushes I am going to give special attention to “brush burn”. This is when a person brushes either too hard or too much in a certain spot and the skin becomes red and irritated. If the spot starts to become really irritated you will see dark red spots appear in the red area. If any irritation occurs, stop! Let this heal. There are products you can purchase online or at most pet stores for hot spots. Typically this comes in a spray or foam, and is used to help their skin feel better. I keep this on hand, as I never know how sensitive a dog’s skin can be to brushing. Always pause to check for redness. If your pet starts to fuss while brushing first ask yourself if you’ve recently checked the skin! Lastly, even if not mentioned brush burn can happen with ANY brush and ANY type of fur. There are certain brushes that may cause it more easily than others. 

I will update the article with pictures as soon as I can gather up my tools!

Types of Brushes:

Slicker: This brush has small, fine metal bristles that are typically hooked on the end. This is used for helping to brush out mats on long coated dogs. Because of how close these bristles are and because normally these brushes do not have plastic tips on the bristles either, they can cause brush burn if used in the same spot for too long. They come in a variety of sizes and bristle length. Make sure you get one long enough that will get all the way through the coat to the skin.

Pin: Pin brushes are similar to slicker brushes. Typically round in shape, the bristles are more stiff, spread farther apart and have a cover at the end or are more rounded. They make these for people too, although I do not recommend using people brushes as they may break. These brushes are used for the silkier breeds, Silkie Terriers and Yorkies as some examples. Although you can use a slicker brush on these breeds, their fur is typically much thinner and can develop brush burn more easily, so the pin brush is easier on their skin. I also love to use this type of brush in the bath! I brush through the conditioner to make sure the dog is soft and tangle free!

Comb: For your dog, you should always use a metal toothed comb. You can find these at most pet stores and online! These are great for going in after using a pin or slicker bruck to find tangles or mats you may have missed. No need to try and get those out with the comb if they are too big, as it can pull on the skin. Take turns using your comb and brush to get out all the tangles and mats! They also make shedding combs which are metal and have 2 different sized teeth and are closer together to catch the undercoat, and are great for golden retrievers, shelties and similar. 

Shedding Blade/Furminator: I decided to put all of these tools together because they are all very similar in both function and the types of breeds that use these tools. Shedding blades are metal and small v shaped teeth. You will see them in big loops with a handle for bigger jobs, but personally I avoid using these. The ones I would suggest have a wooden handle and are much smaller. Not sponsored in any way but I am in love with my SleekEZ brand. Anything similar would be great, I feel this just helps me make sure I get out more undercoat while being able to work around the dog’s skeletal structure better. Furminator is another name brand tool, but you can find others just like it. The Furminator is similar to the SleekEZ, but has a button to help release the hair from the brush. They come in more of a variety of sizes, and their packaging helps pet parents know which size is right for them! These are my go to’s for huskies, malamutes, heavy shedding labs, german shepherds, etc. 

Bristle: These bristles are the closest together, and are typically made of plastic or natural fibers and are much softer. A lot of times you will find these made for dogs with a bristle brush on one side and a pin brush on the other side. Bristle brushes can be used for both long and short haired dogs! On long coated dogs after the de-tangling process to help make their coats shinier, and to help clean and deshed very short and smooth coated dogs like boston terriers, boxers, and italian greyhounds. These are great for those later breeds as most other brushes could cause brush burn on them as their coats are so fine. 

Rake: These are metal toothed and come in a variety of styles, google “undercoat rake” and you will see what I am talking about. Like you will be able to see when I get this updated, my favorite has 2 rows of metal teeth, the front row is longer than the back. As suggested by the name, these are another tool for heavy shedders with double coats like Malamutes, Huskies, and Chows. There are also ones that typically have 1 row, and have a hook on every other or every third tooth. Be careful with these! It is very easy to cause brush burns and also called “dematting rakes”. I rarely use them, so just use caution when using them to be sure you use them on the correct areas and breeds of dog. 

Rubber Curry Brush: These are rubber type brushes and are typically round and fit in your hand. Used on short coated dogs, I like to use them during the bath to help massage the dog and work the soap into the coat. It feels great for them and helps get a really good clean on them! I do not recommend using these on long coated dogs, pin brushes will give you this effect for those breeds! Rubber curry brushes can also be used on short coated dogs outside the tub on dry dogs to help remove dead skin and hair, and can even be used on breeds that use bristle brushes as long as you watch for skin irritation. Zoom Groom is a name brand item for these, and I do prefer these as I like the way they fit in my hand the style of rubber teeth. 

These are the most common brushes that you will use at home! I hope I was able to cover most of the major ones, with recommendations on brands the best that I can! Please feel free to leave comments if you have any questions, I would love to answer them! Have a most wonderful day and I hope you and your pet enjoy many wonderful grooming sessions together!

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