General Dog Care

Welcoming A New Puppy Into Your Home: Things to Consider

Welcoming a new puppy into your home is super exciting! Having a dog in your life can help reduce stress and loneliness along with helping you stay more active as you walk and play with your dog.

But dog ownership is a huge undertaking that should not be taken lightly. In my years as a dog groomer I have had numerous encounters with new pet parents who are overwhelmed with just how much work taking care of a puppy is, and in some situations the pet parent ended up giving their dog to another family. 

So with this article I am hoping to help you prepare for your new puppy so help the transition be as smooth as possible and to also help you decide if dog ownership is right for you.

Sit down with your family and discuss the following:

Depending on how many people are in your family, you should have a serious sit down discussion about the amount of effort each family member wants to put in. If you are single, that is even more to consider. 

First thing I think someone should consider is the amount of time and resources owning a dog takes, especially a puppy. It’s recommended that the new owner take a few days off to help the puppy get situated, is this possible for you? When you first get your puppy you will also be at the vet quite often with shots, tests for heart worms and other things. This requires a lot of time and finances. When it is time to get your puppy spayed or neutered, your puppy could take up to 10 days to heal. Someone will need to be with them the full 10 days to make sure they are healing up properly and all after care instructions are followed. So this will require either getting help from outside places like a family member or friend or the family inside the house take turns. 

Other time and care considerations will be exercise, training, and grooming. These will all depend on the breed you get and the dog as an individual. Training will begin not long after the puppy arrives and will take a team effort. Make sure everyone is on the same team when it comes to who will take what roles. Sometimes it helps to establish who will take care of the grooming, who feeds and waters the dog, and so on and so forth. There is no such thing as too much preparation! Again, if you are solo then consider that you will have to do all these things by yourself. Your work schedule will have to be accommodating for all of these things. 

A final piece of consideration to getting a new puppy is the breed of puppy you get. Breeds like Huskies or Malamutes are not recommended breeds for first time dog owners. They need several hours of exercise a day, along with major grooming needs. If you are considering a poodle mix of some sort (think doodle), keep in mind you never know how your dog will look in the end. They have massive grooming needs and you will be at a groomer typically every 4-6 weeks.

If you are not sure of what breed of dog to get, akc.org has a quiz that you can take, and they ask you about the different aspects of your life to help you find the best fit for you! They also have a list of reputable AKC certified breeders if that is the route you want to take. Also look at local rescues, there are many breed specific rescues as well!

Now that we have done some serious planning and research and have found our perfect breed and breeder/rescue, let’s get to the fun part. Buying all the things your puppy will need when they get to your home! 

Items to have before your puppy arrives home

I came across a couple of websites that gave wonderful lists of items to have when welcoming your new puppy, and like always I will have all my references at the end of the article!

  1. Crate
  2. High Quality Puppy Food and High Quality Treats
  3. Water and Food Bowl
  4. Variety of Toys
  5. A Sturdy Leash and Collar
  6. I.D. Tags
  7. Bed
  8. Stain and Odor Remover

Other items that may not be necessary depending on living and training situations but I do recommend also having baby gates and puppy pads. 

Let’s dive deeper into each of these items:

Crate: Your puppy’s crate will be a safe place for them to go to feel secure and to sleep. It will take time for your puppy to be used to their crate and there are lots of articles, videos and podcasts out there to help you with that process. Another note is you do not need to have a large crate! Your puppy’s crate needs to be big enough for them to stand up and turn around but nothing more. If your puppy is going to be a larger breed, consider getting a large cage with dividers. They allow you to have an appropriate size without having to keep upgrading and spending money on cages. 

High Quality Food and Treats

Nutrition is so important for your puppy to grow up healthy and strong. I personally advise getting your puppy’s food from a pet store and avoid major chains that don’t specialize in pets. When I look for new food for my pets, I always look at the ingredients list. When it comes to pet food, they list the ingredients by weight. Avoid any foods where the first ingredient is corn or corn meal. These are filler ingredients that don’t do anything for your pet nutrition wise. I look at the first 5 ingredients to make sure they are healthy options. 

Please note, if you see “meal” at the end of a food that’s okay! When you see “chicken meal” or “beef meal” that simply means that the food has been dehydrated and the moisture taken out. No water weight, all nutrition and protein!

Water Food and Bowl

This one is pretty simple. Make sure the bowl walls are not too high so your puppy isn’t struggling. Or, the opposite. My last dog was a Saint Bernard, so my family needed to invest in a set of water and food bowls that were lifted up to her, even at a very young age. It is very important especially with large breeds to prevent bloat or other digestive issues with any breed of dog to have the appropriate height bowls.

Variety of Toys

Toys are going to help keep your puppy entertained and help burn that puppy energy. When purchasing toys, pick a variety. You never know what your individual puppy will find the most fun. Do they like squeaky toys? Frisbees? Rope toys? There are so many to pick from. Toys are also helpful when it comes to puppy biting, when your puppy nips you, give them a toy instead! Also grab a few for teething, as your puppy will go through teething just like a human infant does. Having something like a soft rubber toy (you can typically find the puppy specific ones in softer colors in the pet stores) will help soothe their gums. 

Note, I would advise getting some sort of chest or container to keep the toys in. Changing out the toys daily helps keep things mentally stimulating and they won’t get bored which can happen if they have access to all of their toys all of the time. It will also help your home stay cleaner!

Sturdy Leash and Collar

It’s going to be so tempting to buy all the cute collars that have the plastic buckle but those plastic buckles will wear over time and eventually will no longer hold, and they typically give when you need them to hold the most. I personally love the collars that have a metal belt type buckle on them. Nylon is great because it’s easily washed, and a leather collar is really sturdy and can also be wiped down easily. 

When picking your leash, pick one that is about 6-8 feet long. Retractable leashes are hard to use when training your puppy and most dog trainers do not recommend them. They can also break if your dog lunges and pulls on the leash hard enough. Same as the collar, a sturdy nylon or leather leash will last you some time. 

Make sure to pick the appropriate weight and thickness. A leash for a Shih Tzu or chihuahua will be much smaller and thinner than a leash for a Labrador Retriever. 

I.D. TAGS

Make sure to always have I.D. Tags on your puppy! Since they are so new to your home, if they accidentally run away they won’t know where to run back to. Talk to your vet about microchipping as well, as tags can fall off and are not a 100% way of getting your puppy back. Microchipping also helps if the unfortunate event happens that your puppy is taken, a vet will be able to scan the chip and see your information registered. 

Beds

Again, a pretty straight forward item. With the cage, make sure it isn’t too big so they can snuggle up and stay secure. I would put a bed where you would like your puppy to rest as well if you do not plan to let them on the couch or your own bed. Look for ones that are easily cleanable, as puppies have accidents. I also advise not purchasing expensive beds for your puppy until they grow out of the chewing phase. I’ve personally lost many dog beds during this time!

Stain and Odor Remover

As mentioned before, puppies have accidents. Having a good stain and odor remover is important, because you want to make sure no odor is left behind. Not only for your own home, but once they smell the spots they pee they tend to go in the same spots again. 

I hope this list and in depth dive to getting a puppy helps you and your family welcome the new bundle of fur! I want to end this article with an extra stress on thinking of training, grooming and veterinary care. Currently this article is being written October 2021, and animal professionals are currently overflowing with the rise of dog ownership due to the coronavirus. Depending on the times you get your puppy, sometimes contacting professionals weeks and months in advance is required. My grooming salon is typically booked weeks out, veterinarians booked out even longer. Do research and find each of these professionals that you want to work with either right when your puppy comes home or before, so when the time comes you won’t be stressed trying to find someone who can take your dog on short notice. 

References

language

DogTime. “Bringing Home Your New Dog: Prepping and First Steps.” DogTime, DogTime, https://dogtime.com/dog-health/general/262-adults-bringing-home. Accessed 7 Oct. 2021.

Perry, Somyr. “9 Things You Need Before Bringing Home a New Puppy | BeChewy.” BeChewy, Chewy, 14 Nov. 2018, https://be.chewy.com/new-puppy-checklist-9-things-you-need-before-bringing-home-a-new-puppy/?gclid=CjwKCAjwkvWKBhB4EiwA-GHjFi6FwP239tFxvbU5dVuUJPbryXObEpKAHNXHKff-aGVDb_AW_PHu1RoCWLIQAvD_BwE.

Uncategorized

CBD Oil and Dogs; What You Should Know

We have all seen the rise in CBD products for humans all over the place. From massive retail chains like Kroger and Walgreens to small individual owned gas stations, there is no denying humans are looking for more natural ways to take care of our bodies.

So when human pet parents experience benefits from using CBD, it’s only natural to wonder if this would be a good fit for their pets as well. When my own dog was diagnosed with cancer, it was an avenue I personally took with my own dog to help her feel better in those hard times. I will make a note here that she was also taking prescribed medications from the veterinarian, so there is no way to tell what truly helped the most. Either way, from my experience I felt she was calmer, less stressed and more comfortable. 

In this article I’m going to go over all the information that I found about CBD for dogs, so you can make the right decision if it is the best fit for you and your pet. Although I promise that I did as much due diligence as possible in my research for this article I need to emphasize that I am not a veterinarian. My hope is that you can take this knowledge to your vet, and work together to find what product is going to be best for your needs. Another note is that this information is only pertaining to dogs, no other animal. If there is interest in other animals I would be more than happy to write an article if I can find any information out there.

What is CBD? What is it used for?

CBD stands for Cannabidiol, and is derived from the cannabis plant. This part of the plant contains no psychoactive agents in it. Most CBD gathered for dogs comes from a hemp plant, which simply means they are a group of plants that contain less than 0.3% THC (healthline.com). 

As I dove into the research for CBD consumption by dogs, I quickly learned that the research is still very new and not much has been done. Healthline.com and mbglifestyle.com both state that although the little research done is very promising, most has also been funded and done by the companies who make the products themselves. Healthline also stated that as of 8/1/2019, there were no FDA approved CBD products for dogs. However, when purchasing products you can always look for a seal from the NACS (National Animal Supplement Council). This group, along with other organizations have been verifying and approving cannabis-derivatives to assist with a variety of pet health and behavioral issues (Pet Business Magazine). I will link all the different places that I went to for research at the end of the article! 

Just like people, CBD is given to dogs for a variety of reasons. After diving into articles in magazines and online, the main reasons I found were for: Joint pain and mobility, pain management for cancer, anxiety and stress, bowel and stomach issues and last but not least epilepsy.  

Lastly, please do not give your dog people grade CBD products! The processes used to create products for people and dogs are different, along with how much dosage is in each product. Always read the packaging before giving any CBD products to your dog.

How should I give my dog CBD? And how much?

One of the most wonderful things about CBD for dogs is that it comes in so many varieties. In the article I found by Pet Business, I came across numerous ways to help your pet receive the benefits of CBD: Oil tinctures for dogs, treats, shampoos, soft chews, and supplements. I recommend looking into the effectiveness of each product before using it. In my research it seemed like oils/tinctures and chews seemed to be the most popular forms to give dogs but it depends on what works best for you and your dog. 

When it comes to how much to give your dog, the product itself should have instructions for how much to give your dog. If it does not come with any instructions, I would stay away! There are plenty of quality products where the companies took the time to test their products to know their maximum efficiency. 

Healthline.com referenced a 2018 study done on dogs with osteoarthritis, which showed that 2mg per kg of weight was the most effective dosage that saw a rise in comfort levels. Recommendations state to start with a low dose and slowly work your way up to a higher dose. Monitor your dog so you can gauge how much to give them and if a higher dose is needed. Do not rush this process, depending on the way the CBD is administered the way it affects the speed of how fast it works.

Food for thought/ Take always

Overall, from my findings I found that CBD does generally have an overall positive effect on dogs. 

When first starting to give your dog CBD, give them the smallest dose possible and watch to see how they feel. Also note when you gave them the CBD and what you hope the results will be. There can be adverse reactions to CBD which can include becoming lethargic, panting excessively, vomiting and drooling. You can overdose your pet with CBD oil! Our bodies process it differently than dogs, so it is very important to make sure your dog is reacting fine to it. 

Now that I have finished up this article, along with having my own personal experience giving my own dog CBD treats, I feel confident that CBD is here to stay and will only continue to grow in pet stores and within veterinary offices as more research is being done. Keep your eye out, and always stay up to date on trends and research! I can’t emphasize enough how important it is to talk to your veterinarian before starting any new regiment of supplements or treats with CBD oil. 

Resources

Chesak, Jennifer. “Thinking about Giving Your Dog Cbd? Here’s Everything You Need to Know .” Mindbodygreen, Mindbodygreen, 10 Sept. 2021, https://www.mindbodygreen.com/articles/best-cbd-for-dogs. 

Lindenau, Kelly. “A Budding Opportunity.” Pet Business, Mar. 2021, pp. 60–62. 

Mills-Senn, Pamela. “Focusing on CBD.” Pet Business, May 2021, pp. 39–42. 

Peters, Alexa. “Treating Your Dog with Cbd.” Healthline, Healthline Media, 10 June 2020, https://www.healthline.com/health/cbd-for-dogs#effects.